Month: April 2018

Blog Post #4 Fatema Mernissi

Blog Post #4 Fatema Mernissi

Hello again blog post readers! Today I will be writing about Fatema Mernissi. I stumbled upon this amazing woman in my research about Morocco and am so happy I did. Fatema Merinissi was a founder of Islamic feminism. Islamic feminism obviously existed previous to her, […]

Excluded…For the right reasons?

Excluded…For the right reasons?

Hey Hey Hey Friends! Long time no see! As promised, blog post number two! I’ll go back at some point and add the link to the podcast I’m going to record about the two of the with my two partners, you remember how it went […]

What happens when a peaceful protest becomes violent

What happens when a peaceful protest becomes violent

Hello Hello Friends!

I know it’s been a while since I last wrote, and I apologize for that. To make up for it, I have two new blogs and a podcast coming up for you all in the next few days. This one focuses on the protests that started to emerge around the mid 1950s, about Apartheid. In particular, I focus on on the solidarity movements that were taking place across the globe in, well, solidarity with the people of South Africa. In class, we spent a good amount of time talking about the Sharpeville Massacre that happened in 1960, so when I was skimming this article I found, it caught my attention. The article is from a literary journal, and it was published in the fall of 1974 (see citation below). The section I read focused a lot on how the world was responding to apartheid in South Africa.

Honestly, I hadn’t really thought about solidarity movements before I read this article. I had always assumed that South Africa was kinda on its own, but its really heartening to hear that other countries were moving up to help support them. It actually reminds me of the solidarity movements that are happening today, with the global Women’s Marches, and the global March for Our Lives protests that have taken place. All of these movements, however, have the unifying theme that they have been primarily peaceful protests, or as peaceful of thousands and thousands of seriously pissed off women and teenagers fighting for their lives can be. The protests led by the African National Congress, and the Pan Africanist Congress started out similarly but then after the Sharpeville Massacre in 1960 they turned more violent. The once-peaceful groups felt that the only way they could get their point across was through violence, although their violence was much lower in the cost of human lives. Unfortunately, the rest of the world was faced with a difficult decision. If they continued to support anti-apartheid movements in South Africa they would also be supporting/condoning the use of violence.

This is not the first time the world has been face with such a decision, and it will not be the last time. So often, causes that start out as peaceful or diplomatic turn violent when people get frustrated. It’s understandable and it’s so hard to continue to protest with words, when the other side is using guns. I just can’t help but relate it again to the world today. So far, most of the protests have not turned violent, and I hope they stay that way. This world has enough violence in it already, it does not need any more.

The Sharpeville Massacre has not been forgotten by the people of South Africa. In the picture below, you can see the mass graves that were dug to remember those who lost their lives during this horrific incident. The graves stretch for quite a while, a reminder of a history the world should not forget (looking at you 45).

 

Until next time!

 

Sharpville Massacure https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sharpeville_Massacre_Graves,_Phelindaba_Cemetery,_Sharpeville,_Vereenegining,_South_Africa.jpg

Reddy, E., S. “Apartheid and the International Community.” Issue: A Journal of Opinion 4, no. 3 (1974): 19-24. Accessed April 12, 2018. JSTOR.

Powered by WPeMatico

Powered by WPeMatico

PODCAST #2!!!

PODCAST #2!!!

http://moniquebeaupre.bergbuilds.domains/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/podcast2.wav Music: MAMA- 110515 Curator: Music Manumit http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Music_Manumit_Podcast/Music_Manumit_Podcast_Talk_Shows/MAMA_-_110515     Enjoy!!!!! Powered by WPeMatico Powered by WPeMatico

Ghanian Highlife

Ghanian Highlife

So after reading about how the Westerners thought that the Ghanian music culture was primitive and tribal, I decided to focus on the complexities of Ghanian music in order to further prove that they are wrong. I focused on the specific ensembles of Ghanian Highlife. […]

Soul to Soul

Soul to Soul

So reading one of the articles I found had me very amused and frustrated at the same time. It was fort of like an emotional rollercoaster to explain it. I found this really cool primary source about this festival in Ghana called “Soul to Soul”. The festival was basically a catalyst for a film and album. It was a blend of Western R&B/Funk artist from the states and rock and drumming artists from Ghana. These artist included big names like James Brown, Ike Turner, Tina Turner, Wilson Pickett, and Voices of East Harlem. It also included the popular Ghanian rock group, “The Aliens”, and also included “The Kumasi Drummers”. The article started off very well until I reached the second or third paragraph when the Westerners actually reached Ghana.

The article starts taking a bad turn when they start talking about Ghanian culture and music in a very derogatory way. Which honestly made me really pissed. They used phrases like “tribal drummers” and “primitive towns”. This anger ultimately turned into laughter when I read what happened at the concert. So the concert was held at the Black Star Square in Accra to celebrate Ghana’s 14th independence day. 100,000 people bought tickets to go to this and this was an all night affair. Things start to get real funny when the night progresses.

So as a couple performances happen they finally get to performances by Santana, Willie Bobo, and the Staples. The crowd didn’t seem particularly interested in this and then the reporter continued to say that “what was going on? Perhaps the audience didn’t know what rock-soul session American style was supposed to be?’ (Moore,15). This frustrated me and also made me laugh because The Africans could just simply not like the music. Why does it have to be that they don’t understand? Just sing and play better.

The second funny moment happened when Tina Turner started to perform her set at 2:45 AM. So Tina Turner came out while the crowd was very tired from the festivities and she was upset. She yelled at the crowd. Later, when Ike Turner came out the crowd started going crazy and this was very funny to me because it abruptly showed the male social and domestic problems of  Ghana which was shameful but also kinda funny in the fashion that it happened. This is in due part because of the bad aura surrounding Ike at the time.

This article was a disappointment to me because the coverage on the festival could have been so much better. It just felt like the reporter was trying to pit Afro – Americanized music and African music against each other and it was very sad. The appreciation is not mutual because I know from what we talked about in class, that Africans appreciated Western music culture. And I could see that in this article because the reporter emphasized how the Ghanians knew about Ike and Tina Turner, the Beatles, and James Brown.

While the Ghanian’s knew about the United States, It is very apparent to see that the people from the states had absolutely no clue as to how complex African music really was. Which is what I talk about in my second blog post.

Powered by WPeMatico

Powered by WPeMatico

Podcast 2- Independence!

Podcast 2- Independence!

http://bkatz.bergbuilds.domains/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Podcast-2-Independence.wav Powered by WPeMatico Powered by WPeMatico


css.php